What causes IT projects to fail & what does a successful project take?

Since the 1950’s, when humans started writing software and programming machines to do things, failure was common. It was also very expensive, but it was necessary. Most of the proceeding years were focused on improving the technology and it is a testament to humans of our capability, intelligence and dedication. I feel it is important to take a moment to stop and look at what humanity has achieved in terms of technology advancement.   ?

Jump to the present and the technology we have at our fingertips enables us to build amazing products and services and solve some serious problems as well as open up amazing opportunities for people and business. But now that we have the technology, the demand and expectation from markets (people) is pushing us to innovate more, build faster, be more efficient.  Makes you wonder where it ends or if it ever does.

However, now that we have the most advanced technology, this has not necessarily reflected in more successful projects. So makes you wonder, If technology is not the problem, then why do IT projects fail?

This month, at a Digital Village Meetup, we explored this question as a group. 

Session Outline

At Digital Village Meetups, we sometimes play a card game. The card game is simple; 6 decks of cards. Each deck representing a category, each card has a question or statement on it. A player rolls a dice, and picks up a card from the respective deck, reads it out, has a go at answering it and then the group discusses it.

In this session, we decided to focus on only one card from one deck and go deep on it as a group.

The original plan of the game was for each group to pick up a card from the deck without knowing what each other group selected. We did this to avoid group think, but we had rigged it so that each person would pick up a card with the same question on it (so we are all answering the same question without knowing).

BUT as each group came to select their card, they would dig into the deck so not to choose the card from the top (as we had planned to happen). The unpredictable nature of people set the tone for what was to come.

Once we broke into groups, each group spent 30 minutes coming up with a summary of their thoughts and ideas about the card they pulled from the deck. Below are the finding for each group:

Group 1:

Question Discussed: Why do IT Projects Fail?

Group 2:

Question Discussed: When running a project, what can you do to improve the feedback loop?

Group 3:

Question Discussed: Why do IT Projects Fail?

Group 4:

Question Discussed: Waterfall vs Agile?

Findings

As a collective group we discussed each groups findings and went deeper into peoples reasoning and experiences and explored what makes a successful project happen? The high-level results were:

Empathy & Attitude towards ‘right and wrong’ 

Of course culture is central to success but having a team culture and attitude and belief that “it is OK to fail, so Im not scared of experimenting and trying something new” is crucial for people to feel comfortable to be relaxed and be intuitive. However, there is a difference between it being OK to fail and and just being incompetent. The difference is in the learning. Were lessons learned and will that happen again?

Leadership

One thing that was obvious is that there needs to be one person holding the torch and keeping everyone aligned and heading in the right direction. This person is crucial to resolving issues and making sure that everybody understands each other. This person is a listener and a communicator and doesn’t necessarily have to be the most liked person in the team.

Process

Having a process in place makes things easier for everyone. So people know what to expect and they don’t ever feel lost about what is supposed to happen next. It gives a structure to something that is very peopley and soft.

Flexibility & Balance

An interesting observation was that there is not necessarily a ‘right’ or ‘wrong’ way to run a project. Agile vs Waterfall; it doesn’t matter and it is unhelpful to argue. It comes down to what is the best process and design for the project at hand.

Project Teams

However a proven structure of running teams is small, cross functioning teams. With complimentary skill sets and knowledge. The formation of the team is that of a group of 3-5 with one project leader. An example of a successful team structure is 3Wks, a software development firm which was acquired by GrowthOps in 2017. Project teams like this are well balanced in their individual capability and this gives a flexibility to solve most problems that are faced within a software project.

Conclusion

It was a lot of fun, but the general gist was humbling. The theme that kept being raised was PEOPLE.

#Peoplearecrazy. They are unpredictable. Everyone is unique and we cannot expect people to behave or think in a particular way.

The silver lining here, is that although the communication and  difference between people is the cause, if we combine these differences in a unified, harmonious and collaborative way, the outcomes are amazing.

This is why Design Thinking and related methods work so well. Because they extract and present each persons thoughts for others to see and understand.

What makes a successful IT Project?

Creating a common ground and shared understanding for all people around the same problem, solution, goal and outcome.

3wks, practiced a relatively unique project management method they designed to include all project stake holders in the development process. With a focus on outcomes that all people (tech and non-tech can understand, it is easier to keep people aligned on track and engaged in the project and the goal.

If you are interested in this process I highly recommend reading this book written by the 2 founders of 3wks; Beyond Agile.

Thanks for reading and hope to see you around the Village sometime soon.

Jason Hardie

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